Vision Therapy: Not Just For Children

Image of a golfer.

Vision therapy is a doctor-supervised program that helps people of all ages improve their visual-motor skills. Therapy helps your eyes and brain work together better, even if you have perfect vision. For years, people believed that some types of eye conditions, such as lazy eye or crossed eyes, could not be corrected after childhood, but, today, vision therapists and other eye care professionals know that's not true. Here’s how vision therapy can help adults!

Conditions Treated

Vision therapy is used to treat a variety of conditions, including:

  • Poor binocular vision. When your eyes do not work well together, problems with reading, depth perception and other problems can occur.
  • Convergence insufficiency. Convergence insufficiency makes it difficult to focus on close objects.
  • Amblyopia. Also known as lazy eye, amblyopia occurs due to lack of central vision in one eye, even though there is no problem with eye health.
  • Diplopia. Diplopia causes double vision.
  • Strabismus. If you have strabismus, your eyes may appear crossed, or one eye may wander or turn in.
  • Other conditions. Brain damage, strokes and injuries can affect your ability to use your eyes, even if your vision is not affected.

Vision Therapy Can Improve Everyday Performance

Your ancestors did not spend their days reading, working on the computer and checking their text messages. Because cave men used near and far vision about equally, they probably did not experience the problems that modern man does. Since hunting and gathering is no longer a viable job option for most individuals, many people spend hours intently focusing on computers and spreadsheets, often with uncomfortable results. The resulting fatigue, eye strain and eye irritation can affect your ability to function at work. The good news is that vision therapy can help!

Vision therapy is also helpful in improving sports performance, whether you are an aspiring professional athlete or a weekend tennis player. Therapy can improve eye-hand coordination, visual reaction time, focusing and eye tracking and teaming.

Symptoms That Can Indicate a Problem

Symptoms can vary based on your individual problem, but vision therapy may be able to help you if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Trouble reading for long periods of time
  • Headaches
  • Eyestrain when reading or using a computer
  • Double vision
  • Attention span problems when you must use your near vision
  • Blurred vision
  • Omitting words when you read
  • Inability to retain what you have just read
  • Reversing letters or numbers
  • Words seeming to run together when you read
  • Irritated or red eyes
  • Trouble with vertigo or motion sickness
  • Losing your place when you read
  • Feeling tired when you read
  • Squinting or covering an eye to see better
  • Words jumping or floating on the page or screen
  • Difficulty with night driving or judging distances
  • Trouble using binoculars

How Can Vision Therapy Help?

Vision therapy has been called physical therapy for the eyes. It can help improve focusing, visual tracking, eye teaming and alignment, visual processing and eye movements. During therapy, you will train your brain, eyes, visual pathways and eye muscles to ensure that your eyes work together and focus properly. You will: learn how you can spend hours on the computer without developing eyestrain and headaches; learn techniques that will help you improve your sports performance; do a better job of judging distances when you drive; or finally overcome lazy eye. Therapy is tailored to your specific problem and is not a one-size-fits-all solution.

If you think you could benefit from vision therapy, contact us today!

Exclusive Offer

New patients receive 15% OFF* first visit.

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

9:30 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

Closed

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Announcements

  • "Resler-Kerber #1!

    Thank you North County for voting
    Resler-Kerber Optometry, Inc. #1"

Featured Articles

Read up on informative topics

  • Nystagmus

    Nystagmus is a vision condition characterized by repetitive, uncontrolled eye movements. These involuntary eye movements may be side-to-side, up and down, or in a circular pattern, which hinders the eyes’ ability to focus on a steady object. Individuals with nystagmus may hold their heads in unusual ...

    Read More
  • Macular Hole

    The condition known as a macular hole refers to a tiny break in the macula that results in blurry or distorted vision. To fully understand the condition, one must understand eye anatomy. The macula is a spot located in the center of the retina (the back portion of the eye). Located where light comes ...

    Read More
  • How It Helps

    The goal of vision therapy is to treat vision problems that cannot be fully addressed through eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. For example, studies show that vision therapy may be beneficial for addressing eyestrain and other issues that can affect a child’s reading abilities. The human brain ...

    Read More
  • How It Works

    Vision therapy, also referred to as vision training, neuro-vision therapy, or vision rehabilitation, is an optometry subspecialty. Vision therapy is prescribed to develop, improve and/or enhance visual function so an individual’s vision system functions more smoothly. Vision therapy can be beneficial ...

    Read More
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Signs and Symptoms Checklist

    Vision therapy, which is also known as vision training or visual training, is an individualized treatment program that can help identify and correct perceptual-cognitive deficiencies that are impacting visual learning, focus, and concentration. Vision Therapy for Children: Checklist While individuals ...

    Read More
  • Pediatric Ophthlamology

    Ophthalmology addresses the physiology, anatomy and diseases of the eyes. Pediatric ophthalmology focuses on the eyes of children. Pediatric ophthalmologists examine children’s eyes to see if they need corrective lenses or other treatments to improve their vision. Training for Pediatric Ophthalmologists Pediatric ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started ...

    Read More
  • Myopia

    Myopia, or nearsightedness, means that your eyes can see close objects clearly but struggle to see things in the distance. Nearly 30 percent of Americans are nearsighted. This condition usually develops in children and teenagers, up to about the age of 20. A teacher or parent might notice a child squinting ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More

Newsletter Signup

Sign up for more articles