Getting Kids to Wear Glasses

Image of kids wearing glasses.

In most of North America, optometrists are known as Doctors of Optometry (D.O.). As physicians, they are able to diagnose eye disease and prescribe medications or corrective lenses. Licensure as a DO requires a Bachelor's Degree and successful completion of a four-year school of optometrics.

Educational specialists, Allen and Virginia Crane, point out in their book "Buzzards to Bluebirds: Improve Your Child's Learning and Behavior in Six Weeks," all optometrists receive extensive education in:

• The detection of eye disease;

• Examination of binocular vision and convergence;

• Fitting eyeglasses and contact lenses, known scientifically as performing refraction.

While all DO's can treat both children and adults, specialized pediatric optometrists complete postdoctoral studies allowing them to specialize in the evaluation and treatment of children. If your child's optometrist has prescribed eyeglasses to help correct your child's vision, it is of particular importance to their academic and athletic success that they consistently wear their glasses. Why? Because much of your child's schooling requires a minimum degree of visual skills for learning and academic success.

Helping Your Child Adjust to Wearing Glasses

The American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus points out that many children with a diagnosis of myopia, or nearsightedness, are delighted by the vision their new glasses provide upon first use. Children diagnosed with hyperopia (farsightedness) or astigmatisms, however, often take several weeks to adjust to the visual changes introduced by their new eyeglasses. A satisfactory adjustment also depends upon your child's age and the comfort of the eyeglasses. Here are some tips recommended by pediatric health specialists:

• Be positive! Depending upon your child's age, cite specific ways in which improved vision through use of their eyeglasses will improve their life, ranging from coloring better, doing jigsaw puzzles, bird watching with grandpa, or playing Little League baseball.

• If able, allow your child to pick out their eyeglass frames.

• Ensure that the eyeglasses fit your child properly and are comfortable. For instance, most infant and toddler eyeglasses are constructed with "cable temples" that wrap behind the ears. As your child grows, these cables become too short and can cause irritation and discomfort around the ears. Frames can become too narrow for a child’s head causing headaches and sore temples. Another common complaint is reddened areas and discomfort where the nose pieces rest. Schedule regular and frequent check-ups and readjustments to ensure a comfortable fit as your child grows.

• Polycarbonate lenses are lighter for children to wear and safer in the event that the eyeglasses are accidentally broken.

• Purchase replacement insurance on your child's glasses. The additional cost will be more than paid for in the benefits of allowing your child to be physically active and playful without worries that their eyeglasses might break.

• Speak with your child's optometrist about any children's educational material specifically targeted to children -- coloring books, brochures written for children or other items -- available through his or her practice.

Sources:

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. “Glasses Fitting for Children.”

American Optometric Association. “Toys, Games, and Your Child’s Vision.”

KidsGrowth Child Health™. “Getting Kids to Wear their Glasses.”

Exclusive Offer

New patients receive 15% OFF* first visit.

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

9:30 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

Closed

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

8:30 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Announcements

  • "Resler-Kerber #1!

    Thank you North County for voting
    Resler-Kerber Optometry, Inc. #1"

Featured Articles

Read up on informative topics

  • Nystagmus

    Nystagmus is a vision condition characterized by repetitive, uncontrolled eye movements. These involuntary eye movements may be side-to-side, up and down, or in a circular pattern, which hinders the eyes’ ability to focus on a steady object. Individuals with nystagmus may hold their heads in unusual ...

    Read More
  • Macular Hole

    The condition known as a macular hole refers to a tiny break in the macula that results in blurry or distorted vision. To fully understand the condition, one must understand eye anatomy. The macula is a spot located in the center of the retina (the back portion of the eye). Located where light comes ...

    Read More
  • How It Helps

    The goal of vision therapy is to treat vision problems that cannot be fully addressed through eyeglasses, contact lenses or surgery. For example, studies show that vision therapy may be beneficial for addressing eyestrain and other issues that can affect a child’s reading abilities. The human brain ...

    Read More
  • How It Works

    Vision therapy, also referred to as vision training, neuro-vision therapy, or vision rehabilitation, is an optometry subspecialty. Vision therapy is prescribed to develop, improve and/or enhance visual function so an individual’s vision system functions more smoothly. Vision therapy can be beneficial ...

    Read More
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Signs and Symptoms Checklist

    Vision therapy, which is also known as vision training or visual training, is an individualized treatment program that can help identify and correct perceptual-cognitive deficiencies that are impacting visual learning, focus, and concentration. Vision Therapy for Children: Checklist While individuals ...

    Read More
  • Pediatric Ophthlamology

    Ophthalmology addresses the physiology, anatomy and diseases of the eyes. Pediatric ophthalmology focuses on the eyes of children. Pediatric ophthalmologists examine children’s eyes to see if they need corrective lenses or other treatments to improve their vision. Training for Pediatric Ophthalmologists Pediatric ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started ...

    Read More
  • Myopia

    Myopia, or nearsightedness, means that your eyes can see close objects clearly but struggle to see things in the distance. Nearly 30 percent of Americans are nearsighted. This condition usually develops in children and teenagers, up to about the age of 20. A teacher or parent might notice a child squinting ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More

Newsletter Signup

Sign up for more articles